GDPR compliance and log data

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (EU GDPR) came into force on 25 May 2018. Many of us remember the influx of marketing emails around this time, with companies updating their privacy policies and asking for the consent of around 450 million Europeans to continue using their personal data. An often misunderstood participant of this compliance quest is log data—​a source potentially rich in protected personal data. So, how does the GDPR apply to an organization’s log data?

The disappearing Windows DNS debug log

The Windows DNS debug log contains valuable information on DNS queries and activity that is especially useful for monitoring and analyzing malicious traffic. This requires some configuration changes for the DNS service in order to enable debug logging.

NXLog in an industrial control security context

Industrial Control Systems (ICS) have evolved over the years and now have a lot in common with traditional IT systems. Low-cost Ethernet and IP devices are replacing older, proprietary technology, which opens up new possibilities to improve connectivity and remote access. However, it also increases vulnerability to cyberattacks and incidents since the system is no longer segregated. Due to the nature of ICS, they differ from other IT systems.

Raijin vs Elasticsearch

Log collection is most closely linked to enterprise security practices—​for example, aggregation and analysis in a SIEM. However, it is often valuable to collect certain logs for reasons other than security. It may even be a requirement of your organization, for the purposes of auditing, legal compliance, or data retention.

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